Actor: Leopold Rudolf

two-in-a-car-1951-zwei-in-einem-auto-marischka-recensione-review-kritik

TWO IN A CAR

Ernst Marischka’s Two in a Car perfectly embodies the mood of the melodramatic but nonetheless entertaining post-World War II Wiener Films, also proving to be a witty portrait of the society of the time.

mozart-1955-the-life-and-loves-of-mozart-hartl-recensione-review-kritik

THE LIFE AND LOVES OF MOZART

Particularly accurate in its settings and sufficiently attentive to the love torments of the two young protagonists, The Life and Loves of Mozart is distinguished by a direction that, however, would have needed more closeness to the characters themselves, in order to better render their internal conflicts derived from the difficult choices they have to make. In competition at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival.

radetzkymarsch-1964-kehlmann-review

RADETZKYMARSCH

An anguished sense of death and claustrophobia pervades Radetzkymarsch, directed by Michael Kehlmann in 1964 and an adaptation of Joseph Roth’s homonymous novel. The Habsburg monarchy, for its part, seems to us like a kind of golden cage. A cage inside which Carl Joseph and his father Franz, the film’s protagonists, are prisoners.

der-rabe-1951-the-raven-steinwendner-review

DER RABE

Today, Austrian avant-garde cinema is extremely prolific and full of interesting ideas. Yet few people know that it was officially born after the end of World War II and, specifically, in 1951, the year in which artist, painter and photographer Kurt Steinwendner made his Der Rabe, a highly experimental film transposition of the famous poem The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe.

1-april-2000-1952-liebeneiner-review

1. APRIL 2000

It is not surprising that a feature film like 1. April 2000 (a fine fantapolitical satire directed by Wolfgang Liebeneiner) was made precisely in 1952, seven years after the end of the world war and only three years before the Austrian State Treaty by which, among other things, the nation’s neutrality was officially proclaimed.