Month: January 2021

WHAT WE WANTED

Director Ulrike Kofler tried to depict the crisis of a couple who cannot have children in her debut feature What we wanted (original title: Was wir wollten), based on the short story Der Lauf der Dinge by Peter Stamm, distributed by Netflix and presented by Austria at the Oscars 2021 as a candidate for Best Foreign Language Film.

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY 2021 – EVENTS OF THE FORUM AUSTRIACO DI CULTURA ROMA

On the occasion of Holocaust Remembrance Day 2021, the Forum Austriaco di Cultura Roma organised two events that are perfectly enjoyable from home. These are the screening of the documentary Mauthausen – Two Lives (Simon Wieland, 2020) – online from the 25th of January at 6pm – and the interview with Dario Venegoni, president of the Associazione Nazionale degli Ex-Deportati nei campi nazisti (ANED) – online from the 28th of January at 6pm.

THE STORY OF TECHNOVIKING

The Story of Technoviking focuses on the legendary protagonist of a viral video from several years ago, but at the same time examines closely the current phenomenon of social media, how it influences our lives and how easy it is to become ‘famous’ today, often unknowingly.

LUNZ UND SEINE SEEN

The mood of Lunz und seine Seen is particularly romantic and contemplative, and unlike the directorial approach adopted in the numerous other propaganda documentaries made in those years, it aims above all to give the film its own, marked personality.

HORROR FILM IN AUSTRIA

Despite several films – many of them particularly noteworthy – made from the origins of the cinema, horror film in Austria has never yet seen a group of filmmakers take a common direction to create a real movement. At least until today.

RUDOLF PÖCH’S ETHNOGRAPHIC CINEMA

During World War I, the Austrian anthropologist and filmmaker Rudolf Pöch, the undisputed father of Austrian ethnographic cinema, was of great importance. He was the first to ask the authorities for permission to use the new means of photography and film in order to be able to study the different ethnic groups around the world, starting with Russian prisoners of war.

THE CREEPY HOUSE

Intending – at least in his debut – to follow in his father’s footsteps (at least in part) by devoting himself to the horror genre, in his The Creepy House, Daniel Prochaska had fun drawing heavily on cult films of the past in order to make a light-hearted coming-of-age with disturbing implications, mainly for a very young audience.