EINE SACHE DER PERSPEKTIVE

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by Gerda Leopold

grade: 7

Film director and producer Gerda Leopold – specialising in the production of feature-length films in Virtual Reality and founder, in 2014, of Amilux Film – in her Eine Sache der Perspektive (“a question of points of view”) has staged a contemporary drama in which, from time to time, we are shown the point of view – exclusively through point-of-view shots – of a different character, for a series of interconnected episodes. All this makes for a totally innovative feature film from a technical perspective, premiering on Monday, 19 October 2020, at the renowned Breitenseer Lichtspiele in Vienna.

La Ronde

Reality, depending on the point of view from which it is observed, can take on the most diverse connotations. This is a fact. Film director and producer Gerda Leopold, specialised in the production of feature-length films in Virtual Reality and founder of Amilux Film in 2014, knows this well. And in her Eine Sache der Perspektive (‘A Question of Viewpoints’), she has staged a contemporary drama in which the point of view – exclusively through point-of-view shots – of a different character is shown each time in a series of interconnected episodes. All this makes for a totally innovative feature film from a technical aspect, premiered on Monday, 19 October 2020, at the legendary Breitenseer Lichtspiele in Vienna.

A man arrives in Vienna after a bus journey: he has to visit someone very important. A young woman has just got a new job as a set designer, which might allow her to earn some money to make ends meet and take care of her little daughter. A charming cleaning lady has – probably just out of interest – a secret love affair. A handsome writer meets a young kindergarten teacher who works also as a bartender to earn extra money, and they immediately develop a certain chemistry. How are all these stories connected?

Eine Sache der Perspektive immediately presents itself as a crescendo of events and emotions. And if, on the one hand, it is the city of Vienna that provides the ideal setting – here treated as a real character, as a silent spectator of many, many stories – it is also true that the Austrian capital is – fortunately! – presented to us without the classic clichés to which, especially in films, it is common to refer. The Ferris wheel in the Prater, then, and St. Stephen’s Cathedral are, here, only part of the essential sets on a theatrical stage. Besides, it is the characters themselves who carry the whole thing on their shoulders.

What is so special about this? Simple: with a completely innovative directorial approach, Gerda Leopold decided to shoot everything with point-of-view shots, changing each time the perspective of the individual characters involved. In order to achieve this, no less than five go-pro cameras were used by each actor, responsible for the success of each scene (shot rigorously twice).

And if this approach may initially seem a little risky, it works. And it also works quite well: the spectator immediately feels involved in the stories, becomes part of a Schnitzler-esque loop, where – precisely according to the poetics of Arthur Schnitzler himself – what emerges above everything is a deep sense of loneliness experienced by each character. Loneliness and lies that emerge loud and deafening and that hurt like a punch to the stomach.

The same applies to a successful crescendo as one approaches the finale. Accompanied by a well-chosen musical score, the emotions of the characters gradually become more alive and pulsating, the atmospheres become more disturbing, the sounds are often distorted. Until the final climax, where important references to Viennese Actionism provide a perfect culmination to the entire carousel. And the spectator, for his part, what does he do? It is up to him to identify with one or other of the protagonists, to laugh with him, to suffer with him. Thanks, above all, to a highly experimental work, born almost as a game, but also extremely skilful and intelligent. A sign that there are still many new ways of understanding the seventh art. And we welcome innovations capable of surprising us once again.

Original title: Eine Sache der Perspektive
Directed by: Gerda Leopold
Country/year: Austria / 2020
Running time: 87’
Genre: drama, ensemble movie
Screenplay: Gerda Leopold
Cinematography: Sebastian Endler
Produced by: Amilux Film

Info: the website of the Amilux Film