Month: April 2019

breathing-2011-atmen-markovics-review

BREATHING

As the title itself suggests, in Breathing, Karl Markovics’ debut film, air is, after water, the second central element. Forced into a world that is not appropriate for his age and that doesn’t seem to belong to him at all, Roman feels he is suffocating and, although he doesn’t have gills, paradoxically it’ s underwater that he really breathes, finding his own, unusual dimension.

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THE CITY WITHOUT JEWS

1924, the year in which The City without Jews was filmed and for the first time screened to the audience, is a crucial year. Only a few months later, in fact, Adolf Hitler will publish Mein Kampf, giving rise to feelings that had remained, until then, (not too) dormant. The author of the novel – Hugo Bettauer, who, here, also collaborated with Breslauer and Ida Jenbach on the screenplay – had already portrayed two years earlier one of the many possible consequences of this latent resentment. And he had done so in perhaps the most disturbing of all ways: satire.

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WONDER WHEEL – CINEMAS AT THE VIENNA PRATER

After the first film projection in Austria, the Viennese were enthusiastic about this new invention, to the point of making it one of their favourite pastimes. What more urgent, then, than to open new cinemas, so that more and more spectators could enjoy this exciting entertainment? And that’ s where our beloved Prater came in…

heidi-1965-werner-jacobs-review

HEIDI

Werner Jacobs’ Heidi is a pleasant and extremely simple fairy tale, considering Spyri’s novel from which it is inspired. Nowadays, it seems to us to be a film intended almost exclusively for young and very young audiences, in which there are no real villains. Each character, therefore, is driven by personal, strong motivations that, at the end of the screening, are mercifully justified.

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THE SEVENTH CONTINENT

In The Seventh Continent, Michael Haneke’s first feature film, what we observe is the progressive and sudden disintegration of the contemporary bourgeois family, observed and approached in an almost Schnitzlerian style, complete with omnipresent violence that is never really represented before our eyes. A constant theme, this, in Haneke’s rich filmography.

the-third-man-1949-reed-austria-outside-austria-review

THE THIRD MAN – THE OTHER FACE OF VIENNA

In Carol Reed’s The Third Man, Vienna is represented with a double face that can be associated now with Holly Martins, now with Harry Lime. Martins’ Vienna is a “superficial” Vienna, where culture is ostentatious and where strangers, welcomed with cordiality, are constantly looked upon with suspicion. On the other hand, Lime’s Vienna is an underground Vienna, populated more by shadows than by light. The Vienna of lawlessness, of crime, the lesser-known Vienna, but, nevertheless, a more alive and pulsating Vienna.

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HOW I TAUGHT MYSELF TO BE A CHILD

How I Taught Myself to be a Child, directed by Rupert Henning, is a film that often falters, that goes around in circles due to the multiple narrative twists within it, that often goes over the top. Yet all this is complemented by a vitality and freshness excellently portrayed by the young, lively and at the same time extraordinarily composed Valentin Hagg in the title role. Real added value for the film.

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FOUR EMPERORS AT THE CINEMA

On the occasion of the first International Hunting Exhibition, Emperor Wilhelm II of Prussia and Germany travelled to Vienna in 1910 and, together with Emperor Franz Joseph, paid an official visit to a cinema in the Prater…